Four Eyed Cat Lady in a Pink Hat

goldannaple:

dbooox:

FROZEN Animal parody!

Id watch it

taz-arts:

liara tries ice cream for the first time, has deeply spiritual experience

taz-arts:

liara tries ice cream for the first time, has deeply spiritual experience

laikaken:

(◞ꈍ∇ꈍ)◞♥

laikaken:

(◞ꈍ∇ꈍ)◞♥

hafanforever:

From Coloring Book to Final Film: Hans’s Downfall

In this analysis, I had discussed a scene that appeared in the novelization and jumbo coloring book, but was deleted from the theatrical version of Frozen, where Hans does not get knocked out by the impact of his sword hitting against Anna’s frozen body. He tries to attack Elsa as she mourns for Anna, but Kristoff manages to step in in time and hit Hans, which then puts him into an unconscious state.

I had previously explained that the moment of Kristoff stopping Hans was removed because it took away the dramatic moment of Elsa mourning for Anna, which was considered far more important. That makes a lot of sense to me, since the heart of the film is their relationship, and now Elsa is in deep grief over losing the person she loves most in the world. Not to mention that when Elsa starts crying over Anna, everything around her falls silent, so it seems that it would be wrong to interrupt that, especially with a brief moment of fighting action.

And since I first made the original post, I have done some further thinking and can make sense of another reason on why it is better that Hans was knocked out by hitting Anna’s body rather than it not happening and having Kristoff intervene and fight Hans.

Remember that Anna saving Elsa was an act of true love. And it wasn’t just an act that saved her own life, but Elsa as well. The way I see it, Hans getting knocked out after hitting Anna’s frozen body showed that she symbolically defeated him because of the love she has for her sister. Once he was out cold, the danger was over and Elsa was safe.

So if Hans didn’t get knocked out like it was originally planned, that seems to imply that Anna’s act only partially worked. When Elsa begins to mourn for Anna, she is not completely safe from Hans. And this meant that help was needed, which is why Kristoff interferes and knocks down Hans once and for all.

Make any sense?

And on a minor note, the fact that Kristoff was originally was supposed to knock Hans down suggests that this film was another fairy tale in which a man faced off the villain and saved the princess (or queen, in this case). But by removing it from the final film, it shows that Elsa and Anna didn’t need a man at all to stop the villain from killing them.

So I have here the two coloring book pages that show the original scene in contrast with two gifs from the same moment in the final film. Given all that I have said, which version of this scene makes more sense to you? ;)

toastyhat:

We are dead, but we live on in what came After Us.

Separate Gifs

Rough Versions

mayonose:

Honey and Gogo

mayonose:

Honey and Gogo


Thank you~

image

Thank you~

..and you are the world to me!!

lilfayt:

….. I wish facebook would stop asking for my telephone number. It feels like some pushy guy who just won’t take no for an answer…

Stop it facebook :/